project management

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Effective Quality Software Documentation

Software quality encompasses a number of factors such as number of defects, complexity, functional behavior coverage, and usability. The higher the quality of a solution the lower the total cost of ownership (TCO) as well as the higher the return on investment. As obvious as this idea is many developers fail to consider any of it while producing a solution. In the fast past world of software engineering most people involved get caught up in the idea that motion equals progress.

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Managers in Hot Air Balloons

While slugging through some rather interesting (in a bad way) slob of Spaghetti Code (tm) a management type drifted into my office and asked completely straight faced "Why do you need so much more time to complete the configuration control project?"

After re-orienting my brain from the dizzying code I explained that the code was slapstick at best and practically incomprehensible, and that they had laid off every one of the team that had been working on it before they completed the work.

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Project Management

It is easy to just grab some materials and start hammering a new patio to a house or to open an integrated development environment (IDE) and begin writing code using all the advanced snippet libraries to create a new application. However, to build something complex such as a complete house, or solid application requires more work than most people, including developers, understand or even believe.

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Short Sprints vs. Long Goals

Running a development using SCRUM mixed with Agile has a lot of benefits. But, every once in a while (read as "yesterday") a requirement comes up that just seems to defy all logic and being able to be split down. This isn't the first time to run head on into this large wall (or immovable object). Although rare, this does happen.

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Re-evaluating Project Requirements

In developing project criteria/use cases/stories a certain point is reached where it is concluded that "enough" has been done and the results are "good" to begin work. Which is to say that the requirements are "good enough."

It is not unusual to wonder, after work begins, if the information really was good enough. It is worth re-evaluating the requirements once a little effort has been done. This helps to flush out missing details. A reasonable set of questions to ask are:

  • Were any important variables missed in collecting the data used to produce the requirements?
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Getting a grip on my daily routine

Well I need to force myself to be better at time management and project management. It has been a long time since I taught my time management course and I find that without that regular refresher my time management skills have been slipping.

So what to do. Well obviously start researching time and project management again, dust off the course and start collecting data.

So far I have found some very interesting things.

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How do you get to getting to fixing that you are not getting things done?

Reading "The Art of Getting Things Done" and thought I'd poke around for possible software that might be conducive to the style of life management discussed. I ran across this presentation (http://www.davidco.com/mindmanager/mm_replay.html) by David suggesting that MindManager from MindJet (http://www.mindjet.com/us/) was an excellent tool for safely recording all the little notes, projects and to-dos for later retrieval.

Dave also presents a 10 minute overview of his whole Getting Things Done philosophy. In other words there are many interesting points.

Leeland's picture

How do you get to getting to fixing that you are not getting things done?

Reading "The Art of Getting Things Done" and thought I'd poke around for possible software that might be conducive to the style of life management discussed. I ran across this presentation (http://www.davidco.com/mindmanager/mm_replay.html) by David suggesting that MindManager from MindJet (http://www.mindjet.com/us/) was an excellent tool for safely recording all the little notes, projects and to-dos for later retrieval.

Dave also presents a 10 minute overview of his whole Getting Things Done philosophy. In other words there are many interesting points.

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Project Management leads to fun games

Well this was unexpected. I was researching the Project Management Process. Which was going great, I have been reading a lot of papers and books on the subject and getting much more comfortable with some of the more common TLAs. Problem is that it seems that every single author decided to come up with her or his own set of TLAs which makes the whole area of process and more specifically project management very fuzzy.

Ran into some very nice items though:

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Source Repository Layout Architecture Considerations

A survey of various source code management layouts is located in the Software Professional Tidbits book at Repository Layouts.

== General Layout Guidelines ==

* Don't introduce the product into the source layout. Products will change, as will the names of modules, the repository core building blocks should remain constant.
* Support versioning on modules. As modules and products develop there will be a need to attach versions to the each release of a given module and product.

Thread Slivers eBook at Amazon

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