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Working with Hypermedia APIs

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Sat, 13-Sep-14 22:00
[This article was written by John Mueller.] Preview Text:  You have probably used APIs of all sorts when creating applications. It doesn’t matter what the platform is, developers generally have to work with APIs to get any work done because modern applications rely on code that is written by someone else and uses an API for communication. ...
Categories: Java

Migrating to Cloud Native with Microservices

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Sat, 13-Sep-14 22:00
On Wednesday July 2nd, Adrian Cockcroft, from Battery Venture, lectured at an IGTCloud and IamOnDemand meetup. Prior to joining Battery, Adrian led Netflix’s migration to a large scale, highly available public cloud infrastructure and drove the cloud-native NetflixOSS platform to become open source as the Netflix cloud management platform. Preview Text:  ...
Categories: Java

How to Network Docker Containers with Weave

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Sat, 13-Sep-14 22:00
Zettio, created by the founders of RabbitMQ, has released Weave--a new networking system for Docker containers. Docker can already connect containers on a single host, but now networked containers can interact even across an unsecured network. Preview Text:  Zettio, created by the founders of RabbitMQ, has released Weave--a new networking system...
Categories: Java

JUnit Rules

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:30
IntroductionIn this post I would like to show an example of how to use JUnit Rule to make testing easier.Recently I inherited a rather complex system, which not everything is tested. And even the tested code is complex.Mostly I see lack of test isolation.(I will write a different blog about working with Legacy Code). Preview Text:  In this post I...
Categories: Java

How to Write a Custom SAML SSO Assertion Signer for WSO2 Identity Server

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:30
This is the 3rd post I am writing to explain the use of extension points in WSO2 Identity Server. WSO2 Identity Server has so many such extension points which are easily configurable and arm the server with lot of flexibility. With this, we can support so many domain specific requirements with minimum efforts. Preview Text:  This is...
Categories: Java

Automation Through Workflow State

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:30
The benefits of automation are well understood: more agile service provisioning, faster time to insight when there are issues, and a reduction in human error as manual interaction is reduced. Much of the premise behind long-term SDN architectural advantages is steeped in the hope that SDN will help enable and ultimately promote automation. But while centralizing control has significant...
Categories: Java

Cube Drone #4: Poom

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:30
Previous Cube Drone comics: Preview Text:  From software developer Curtis Lassam (who writes about comics and code) comes a comic series called Cube Drone. This is Cube Drone #3: Poom. Legacy Sponsored:  unsponsored
Categories: Java

Tutorial: Freedom Board with Adafruit Ultimate GPS Data Logger Shield

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:30
Many times I start with a project and tutorial, only to get interrupted for emergency tasks and assignments. For a long time I wanted to add GPS (Global Positioning System) functionality to one of my projects. While I started a few months ago on this, it took me until this week-end to finish at least the first part: a SD card data logger with GPS :-): I calculate global positioning and time...
Categories: Java

What is New in RavenDB 3.0: Voron

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:30
If you have been following this blog at all, you must have heard quite a lot about Voron. If you haven’t been paying attention, you can watch my talk about it at length, or you can get the executive summary below. Preview Text:  If you have been following this blog at all, you must have heard quite a lot about Voron. If you haven’t been paying...
Categories: Java

Geek Reading September 12, 2014

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:00
I have talked about human filters and my plan for digital curation. These items are the fruits of those ideas, the items I deemed worthy from my daily reading. These items are a combination of tech business news, development news and programming tools and techniques. You will note that some of the formatting has changed, and that is due to the change in my process. ...
Categories: Java

OpenStack: A MySQL DBA Perspective – Sept. 17 webinar

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:00
[This article was written by Yves Trudeau.]I’ll have the pleasure to present, next Wednesday, September 17 at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT) a webinar titled “OpenStack: A MySQL DBA Perspective.” Everyone is invited.The webinar will be divided into two parts. The first part will cover how MySQL can be used by the OpenStack infrastructure including the expected load, high-availability solutions...
Categories: Java

Tip: Xcode 6 Bundle Signing

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:00
Having this problem with your shiny new Xcode 6 GM? Problem also discussed here. Solution 1: Preview Text:  If you've been experiencing bundle signing issues in the GM of Xcode 6, this may be the solution you've been looking for. Legacy Sponsored:  unsponsored ...
Categories: Java

Yes, You CAN Unit Test Client Side Code

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Fri, 12-Sep-14 22:00
When developers think about unit testing web applications, we often focus on server-side code. We may think that testing client-side code (JavaScript, HTML, CSS) either can’t be done or is limited to isolated scenarios. But with the right tools and programming techniques, we can achieve the same rigorous test quality in our client code that we expect from our server code. Preview...
Categories: Java

codecentric challenge 2014

codecentric Blog - Fri, 12-Sep-14 12:55

Man vs. Machine

This fall will see a first in the realm of computer go – a match between a go program and a top European go player on even terms, i.e. without a handicap. And codecentric will be the sponsor of this event. So this will not be your typical codecentric blog post – no hints or strategy around java, agile development, software quality or similar topics. Instead I want to speak about the game of go and computer go – the one topic about as ancient as it gets for games, the other one from the forefront of technology.

Go, the Last Fortress

You may have heard of the east asian board game go being something like the last frontier in computer gaming, the one classic game where humans still outplay even the strongest computer programs. In a certain sense this is true. Chess was conquered in 1997 by the epochal win of IBM’s Deep Blue against then world champion Garry Kasparov. Today, a standard chess program on a typical notebook can probably beat the human world champion. In checkers and backgammon humans are hopeless contenders, too.

For go it is another matter. The game mechanics are extremely simple, as a look at the rules reveals (www.usgo.org). But if you have never played go before and just read the rules, you are probably baffled at the question when the game ends and how to discern the winner. This gives a first hint about the complexity of go: It is quite hard to come up with a good, heuristic algorithm to evaluate a go position – who is ahead and by how much? Another reason why it is so difficult to apply the traditional game tree search algorithms to go that work so well for chess is the sheer size of the go board with its 19×19 intersections. On average, there are 25 different possible moves in a given chess position. In go, you start with 361 and drop slowly down to say 100 or 50. A game of chess lasts for something like 80 (half) moves on average, a game of go for 200 to 300. All this means that there are a lot more numbers to crunch in go than in chess. Accordingly, go programs could look ahead far less than their chess relatives, and up to a few years ago the average go player could easily defeat any go program.

Monte Carlo Algorithms

Enter Monte Carlo methods. One other possible way to come to grips with the vast game tree of go is to replace the knowledge-based classical game-tree search with chance, using random moves to play out certain positions multiple times and determine this way which move might be most promising. As this is completely contrary to the way we humans play and think about go, this approach was largely neglected for a long time. But in the last couple of years, go programming has made enormous progress using Monte Carlo methods. The best programs begin to approach top amateur level.

Challenging Top Human Players

Since 2007 the University of Electro-Communications in Japan hosts the “UEC Cup Computer Go”, something like an inofficial world championship of go programs. Until the recent advances with Monte Carlo methods, computer go was not taken very seriously in the go world. But since 2013, the Nihon Ki-in, the most prominent Japanese professional go players association, agreed that professional go players will play against the strongest contenders of the UEC Cup. For the last few years, the two strongest go programs have consistently been the Japanese program “Zen” and French programmer Rémi Coulom’s “Crazy Stone”. In the play-offs against professional go players in 2013 and 2014, the programs were given a four stone handicap. To offer some perspective: Only an already really strong amateur could hope to beat a professional go player with such a handicap. While Zen was defeated both years, Crazy Stone managed to eke out wins against the professionals, leaving open the question how big the gap in strength between the best go programs and the professional level really is.

codecentric challenge 2014

In a few weeks, the “codecentric challenge 2014″ will pit Crazy Stone against Franz-Josef Dickhut in a five game match, played online on the KGS go server. Dickhut is an amateur 6 dan and eleven times German go champion. In the realm of amateur go, it doesn’t get much stronger than this. No stronger player has ever before agreed to play a serious competition against a go program on even terms, without a handicap. That the winner will not be decided in a single game but in a best-of-five match, gives the challenge additional weight. The first game will be played on Saturday, October 4th, with the other games following on a weekly schedule until one side has registered three wins.

The match was proposed and organized by Prof. Ingo Althöfer of the University of Jena, Germany, who is active in researching the mathematics of games and game programming for some decades now. codecentric on the other hand has agreed to sponsor the event and host the website of the competition. The link to the website will be published here in time before the match begins.

I hope I have been able to awaken your interest in this fascinating game and the oncoming human-computer duel. Stay tuned!

The post codecentric challenge 2014 appeared first on codecentric Blog.

Categories: Agile, Java, TDD & BDD

Date/Time Formatting/Parsing, Java 8 Style

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Thu, 11-Sep-14 23:00
Since nearly the beginning of Java, Java developers have worked with dates and times via the java.util.Date class (since JDK 1.0) and then the  Preview Text:  The new Date Time trail in the Java Tutorials covers Java 8's new classes for dates and times and their formatting and parsing. This post provides examples...
Categories: Java

Going Hybrid Cloud with OpenStack

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Thu, 11-Sep-14 23:00
[This article was written by Nati Shalom & Eliza Croen.] OpenStack Silicon Valley is just a few short days away and we are looking forward to talking OpenStack with the local community. Preview Text:  This deeper integration with OpenStack technology makes Cloudify even more equipped to handle the task of...
Categories: Java

Intel Releases Edison Development Platform for IoT

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Thu, 11-Sep-14 23:00
If you've been looking forward to Intel's Edison development platform since it was announced, your time has come. At the IDF 2014 keynote a few days ago, Edison was released. Intel has brought us IoT. It's a slick little package. You can't read about it anywhere without hearing about how small it is - it's the size of a postage stamp, you see. It's small! Preview Text:  ...
Categories: Java

Reducer.sh - A Powerful MySQL Test-Case Simplification/Reducer Tool

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Thu, 11-Sep-14 23:00
Originally written by Roel Van de Paar Let me start by saying a big “thank you” to the staff at Oracle for deciding to open source reducer.sh. It’s a tool I developed whilst I was working for them several years ago. Its sole purpose is to do one thing – but do it good: test-case simplification. Preview Text:  Let me start by saying a big...
Categories: Java

Metaprogramming With the Type Function

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Thu, 11-Sep-14 23:00
In my book, Practical Maya Programming with Python, I use Python’s type function for dynamically creating custom Maya nodes based on specifications, such as input and output attributes. I really love the type function*, so I thought I’d post another cool use of it. I recently wrote this gem as a way to dynamically create exception types from error codes (it was for a now-defunct REST...
Categories: Java

Scaling with RESTful Microservice Architecture

Javalobby Syndicated Feed - Thu, 11-Sep-14 22:31
[This article was written by Sam O'Brien.] Preview Text:  As a developer, I’m enjoying working on new microservice instances which are effectively greenfield projects with well defined constraints on their interface, but with a flexible internal implementation and therefore a flexible set of tools and frameworks with which we can achieve our...
Categories: Java

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